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Open to all: Why every organisation needs an accessible website

Richard SaundersContensis product owner
25 min read

“The one argument for accessibility that doesn’t get made nearly often enough is how extraordinarily better it makes some people’s lives. How many opportunities do we have to dramatically improve people’s lives just by doing our job a little better?” – Steve Krug, UX expert

Contents

Chapter 1: Introduction

1 in 4 people in the UK have a disability. Source: Scope.

Chapter 2: The case for accessibility

The four accessibility principles also known as POUR, stand for perceivable, operable, understandable and robust.
The four accessibility principles are known as POUR; Perceivable, Operable, Understandable and Robust. Source: W3C.

Chapter 3: First-person perspective: Liam O'Dell

Liam O'Dell's personal bio. Source: Liam O'Dell.

"Technology is evolving at a considerable pace – but I think it’s important to step back and make sure everyone can access information. While it can take time to meet the accessibility requirements, it’s time well spent because accessibility benefits everyone."

Liam O'DellJournalist and campaignerFreelance

Chapter 4: Navigating web accessibility standards

WCAG AA and AAA colour contrast explained side by side.
WCAG AA and AAA colour contrast explained. Source: W3C.

Chapter 5: Building accessible content

The National Trust accessible website navigation
An example of accessible website navigation from the National Trust. Source: National Trust.
An overview of what you should and should not include when writing alt text.
What you should and should not include when writing alt text descriptions. Source: Contensis.
A male presenting to a crowd using a laptop and projector screen.
A male presenting to a crowd using a laptop and projector screen. Source: Zengenti Velocity 2023.
Accessible error messages displayed on a form.
An example of accessible error messages displayed on a form. Source: Contensis.
High contrast colours vs. low contrast colours explained.
High colour contrast vs. low colour contrast. Source: Contensis.

Chapter 6: What does good look like?

An example of how you should display focus states for buttons on a website.
How to display the focus states of buttons on a website. Source: Contensis.
Examples of good and bad typography styles to use on your website.
A visual representation of good and bad typography in practice on a website. Source: Contensis.
Good colour contrast vs. bad colour contrast example using a popular Drake meme.
Bad colour contrast vs. good colour contrast in practice. Source: Contensis.
A comparison of inaccessible and accessible call to action buttons.
A comparison of inaccessible and accessible call-to-action buttons. Source: Contensis.

Chapter 7: Testing and evaluating accessibility

Manual testing vs. automated testing
Manual testing vs. automated testing. Source: Contensis.

80% of customers with access needs will spend their money not on the website that is cheapest but where faced with the least barriers.

Gavin EvansDirector of OperationsDigital Accessibility Centre (DAC)

Chapter 8: Embracing an inclusive mindset

The iterative development loop. Plan > review > test > deploy > launch.
The iterative development loop. Source: Scrum.org.

Chapter 9: Resources and further reading

Richard SaundersContensis product owner

Richard is the product owner for Contensis – our CMS. He sets the direction and roadmap for the product. His background includes both user experience and front-end design.

A white cat with a party hat on.

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